ABOUT THE LITTLE FIREFACE PROJECT

Slow lorises are a unique group of primates found throughout South and Southeast Asia. Their vice-like grip, snake-like movements, shy nature, and most remarkably, their venomous bite, make them unique amongst the primates. They also are to many people undeniably adorable, and to others, nature’s answer to over 100 diseases. Their slow movements make them easy prey to expert hunters who literally empty the forests of these shy primates – amongst the most common mammals seen in Asia’s illegal animal markets, but amongst the rarest spotted even in Asia’s best protected forests.

The Little Fireface Project, named after the Sundanese word for loris, is the world’s longest running loris conservation project, started in 1993, under the auspices of the Nocturnal Primate Research Group of Oxford Brookes University. Our research was highlighted in the award winning 2012 film Jungle Gremlins of JavaWe aim to save lorises from extinction through learning more about their ecology and using this information to educate local people and law enforcement officers, leading  to empathy and empowerment whereby people in countries where lorises exist will want to save them for themselves. This is done through education, media, workshops and  classroom programmes. Our education does not stop in range countries, but also reaches out to potential western purchasers of loris pets.


EFP Congress LFP talks - 25/08/2015

EFP

Below is a list of LFP staff and student talks at the European Federation of Primatology’s congress in Rome. We’re very excited to be involved in such a fantastic meeting of like-minded professionals to share the knowledge we gain here about slow lorises!

Wednesday 26th August (poster sessions)

17:30     Priscillia Miard, K. Anne-Isola Nekaris
              First field surveys and Red List assessment of two Bornean slow                                        lorises (Nycticebus menagensis and N. kayan) using local knowledge in Sabah,                 Borneo.

17:30     Siobhan Webster, Louisa Musing, Asier Vazquez, K. Anne-Isola Nekaris
              Public perceptions of threatened slow lorises (Nycticebus spp.) on Web 2.0 sites               and implications for social media reporting policies. 

Thursday 27th August

10:15     K. Anne-Isola Nekaris, Nabajit Das
              Venom in Furs: pelage variation and its implications for slow loris evolution

13:45     Francis Cabana, K. Anne-Isola Nekaris
              Gimme more: Exudates do not characterise a fallback food in the diet of the                         Javan slow loris (Nycticebus javanicus).

15:30     Kathleen D. Reinhardt, Wirdateti, K. Anne-Isola Nekaris
              Relationships between altitude, habitat structure and behaviour of Nycticebus                      javanicus in a submontane agroforest.

Friday 28th August

12:15     Vincent NijmanWirdateti, K. Anne-Isola Nekaris
              Primate trade on Java – an overview of 25 years of market surveys. 

15:30     Averee LuhrsSimon K. Bearder, K. Anne-Isola Nekaris
             The prospective use of occupancy modelling as a tool for monitoring potto                           (Perodicticus ibeanus) populations in Kibale National Forest, Uganda.