The Nightwatch – Other Firefaces

In the forests of Java, there are more than just lorises lurking in the darkness. Here at LFP we regularly encounter other sets of eyes wandering through the night; civets, bats and the occasional Javan leopard to name a few. It was only two days ago that we were out looking for a new male loris to collar, when I spotted two red eyes walking up the path towards me. The eyes cautiously got closer and closer to me, until stood there 3 metres down the path was a little leopard cat. We exchanged glances for a little while, studying each other until my presence was all too much, where it quickly turned and scurried back into the labyrinth of bamboo. During my ultrasonic recordings of our loris population, the bats of Cipaganti have been dancing around my head, littering my recordings with songs and screams as they perform their evening forage. Instead of discarding their calls as vocal graffiti, instead I have begun to map the various populations based on their various call frequencies and habitat. Over my remaining six months here at the project, I hope to have a better idea of the species that flourish here in this mountainous part of West Java. It is not just the lorises that we spend hours watching and monitoring that make my time here worthwhile, it’s the occasional cameo from one of these other firefaces that make the dark of night so that little bit more intriguing.

Other Firefaces (2)

The curious little leopard cat.

In the forests of Java, there are more than just lorises lurking in the darkness. Here at LFP we regularly encounter other sets of eyes wandering through the night; civets, bats and the occasional Javan leopard to name a few. It was only two days ago that we were out looking for a new male loris to collar, when I spotted two red eyes walking up the path towards me. The eyes cautiously got closer and closer to me, until stood there 3 metres down the path was a little leopard cat. We exchanged glances for a little while, studying each other until my presence was all too much, where it quickly turned and scurried back into the labyrinth of bamboo. During my ultrasonic recordings of our loris population, the bats of Cipaganti have been dancing around my head, littering my recordings with songs and screams as they perform their evening forage. Instead of discarding their calls as vocal graffiti, instead I have begun to map the various populations based on their various call frequencies and habitat. Over my remaining six months here at the project, I hope to have a better idea of the species that flourish here in this mountainous part of West Java. It is not just the lorises that we spend hours watching and monitoring that make my time here worthwhile, it’s the occasional cameo from one of these other firefaces that make the dark of night so that little bit more intriguing. Caption 1: The curious little leopard cat

Other Firefaces (1)

One of my unidentified species of bat roosting in a banana leaf.

  • Dan Geerah, LFP volunteer